The American Dilemma and How We Can Fix It

Posts tagged ‘Floyd Mayweather’

THE BIG FIGHT AND PRISON REFORM

On Saturday, May 2nd there will be a big fight in Las Vegas – just in case you missed hearing about it.  Floyd Mayweather, Jr. and Manny Pacquiao will duke it out at the MGM in what is billed as “the fight of the century.”  (That would seem to be a bit premature as the century is only fifteen years old and who knows what is yet to come).

It is estimated that this fight will generate an insane amount of revenue and that Mayweather and Pacquiao will each earn in excess of $100 million in their 60/40 split.  Since boxing is inherently a violent sport and we know that all liberals would rather hand out flowers and give the peace sign to all passersby than engage in anything combative, I can only assume that conservatives whom the left points to regularly as being instigators of war, dissension and all the ills with which mankind is burdened will be the only people in attendance either in person or via the miracle of Pay Per View.

Further cementing my argument that only conservatives will have the desire to watch this contest is the left’s insistence on bringing to justice and avoiding any of those who engage in perpetrating the “War on Women,” (ISIS being a notable exception) is Mayweather’s rather checkered past in this regard.  His conviction in 2012 of domestic abuse resulted in an 87 day jail term of which he served 60 days.  Apparently the Australian government takes this sort of thing rather more seriously than the American people at large since they denied a visa to Mayweather to come to the Land Down Under to do a promotional tour.

It seems to me rather an anomaly that while we give lip service to the evils of violence, (note the recent protests regarding the violence allegedly inflicted on Freddie Gray in Baltimore, MD by six members of that city’s police department) we not only condone but actively participate in an act of violence because we define it as a sport, boxing.  This certainly demonstrates the human ability to be on both sides of an issue.  While we do not yet know how the charges which have been leveled against the officers who were involved in Mr. Gray’s apprehension and subsequent unfortunate death will be determined in a court of law, we do know that many professional and amateur fighters have died as a result of injuries that they sustained in the ring.

http://www.ranker.com/list/famous-people-who-died-of-boxing/reference

In some regard we have made the “sport” of boxing a bit more civilized than when the ancient Greeks participated in it in the early Olympics.  Then the fighters were matched irrespective of weight and rather than the soft gloves we use today, hard leather straps were wrapped around the fists of the fighters which often resulted in scarring when a solid punch was landed.  Of the three “combat sports,” boxing, wrestling and pantakrion, (a combination of the techniques of the first two), boxing was considered the most dangerous.

As we approach “the big fight” on Saturday, I was startled to learn that a ringside seat in the arena can cost a six figure price.  All to watch two men beat the tar out of each other.  Whatever the outcome of the fight, that we are still so involved as a species in not only witnessing but vicariously participating in what can only be described as a controlled act of violence speaks volumes to our evolution as people.  How much further might we go to satisfy our apparent blood lust?

The left has made the argument that our prisons are bursting at the seams and there is an over-representation among that population of minorities.  Both parts of that statement are true – although the reasons might be subject to debate.  While they have no difficulty supporting abortion on demand, they are horror struck that people are adjudged as having committed crimes that are so heinous as to be deemed worthy of the death penalty.  They point to the fact that we have more people on death row than the rest of the world combined.  That may be because organizations like ISIS don’t normally have a complex process of appeals that lasts for decades and generally dispense summary beheading.  I have also heard some on the most extreme fringe of the political spectrum argue that life in prison itself is “cruel and unusual punishment.”

Here’s a thought that would lower the prison population of people with life sentences or on whom the death penalty has been imposed, would both save us a boatload of money by reducing the numbers of those whom society has to support in our penal institutions and would raise a significant amount of money from blood lusting viewers.  I owe the origination of this thought to the fact that I happened to watch a broadcast of “Gladiator” the other night.

We offer those on death row and those with life sentences the opportunity to get out of jail by participating in a gladiatorial style conflict – a battle to the death. Whether the inmate chose to participate would be at her or his sole discretion.   If the participant survives three of these bouts, she or he is freed.  Now how simple is that?  If we were to implement this it would result in a guaranteed minimum reduction in the number of these criminals by at least 75%.  And consider that if four million people are willing to pay $100 to watch the Mayweather/Pacquiao fight on television, can you imagine what they would be willing to pay to watch a battle to the death?

You might, as a civilized person, recoil from this modest proposal.  I can certainly understand that.  Or perhaps you’re simply concerned that we are going to release some number of known violent criminals back into society.  But we know that under former DOJ Attorney General Eric Holder, hundreds of known violent offenders were let back into the general population.  At least those who were sufficiently depraved would have a few minutes of entertainment and the money from these fights could be heavily taxed to fund research into what there is in our DNA that allows far too many of us to act out violently and hopefully find a vaccine to prevent it in the future.

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT

If it weren’t so sad, it would be laughable.  We descry the violence in our society and our world.  The horrors of gassing civilians in Syria; the number of murders in our inner cities; the general disregard and disrespect for others in our self-centered culture.  And we find the causes to be plentiful.

There’s the breakdown of the traditional home where traditional values at least had the possibility of being taught to our children.  And then there’s the violence that they learn through our media, video games and the movies.  And we wring our hands and wonder why did our little darling go and punch out the neighbor kid just because he was wearing more expensive athletic shoes.

We are an acquisitive society and used to be a competitive one as well.  Keeping up with the Joneses was a well-known phrase and an acceptable form of behavior.  We have been told, and it is true, that the consumer drives the economy in the United States – at least two thirds of it.  So we invent new ways to suck the money out of consumers’ pockets and into the coffers of whatever company has created the latest diversion to amuse our citizens.  Of course, there are a lot of old and tried creations that have been re-invented or more highly glamorized which serve the purpose as well.

On Saturday, September 14th Floyd Mayweather won his latest pugilistic bout.  He was well paid for the effort – a reported $41.5 million.  Even after paying his agent and Uncle Sam, that will leave him with a tidy sum.   Good for him.  That’s entrepreneurship at its finest.

Mr. Mayweather has a talent and he is monetizing his abilities.  The fact is, however, that it is a violent skill which he has mastered.  But if it were not for the rest of us who pay to watch two human beings beat each other up, Pay Per View would not have been able to record its single biggest take for any sporting event.  It’s obvious that we do not condemn violence when we pay money to enjoy the thrill of watching it.

The same statement may be made with regard to the biggest single and, perhaps most violent sport which demands and gets infinitely more of our dollars than boxing – that is NFL football.  That it is violent is inherently obvious from the league’s recent agreement to set aside $675 million to compensate players who have suffered head traumas and brain injuries from their years of participation in the sport.

If football were a prescription drug, with the number of serious “side effects” that it causes among the patient population, the FDA would withdraw its use and further dispensation.  But there is too much, far too much money generated by football ever to consider such an option.  And so, perhaps it is true, that money is indeed the root of all evil.

I wonder if those who are rightfully saddened at the events of Columbine, or Newtown or Aurora have ever considered whether they should withhold their dollars from a sport that has resulted in hundreds of serious injuries that would simply have been avoided if the game didn’t exist.  Or, given the fact that they want to raise their children in a less violent society, they have forbidden their children either to watch football or, more to the personal safety of those children, forbidden them to participate in the game at their schools.  Probably not.

In some ways, watching violent sports is a voyeuristic way for us to release some of our inner hostilities and frustrations.  Most of us handle that fairly well and that is all there is to it.  But there are those who are the exception to the rule and whose inner psyche actually feeds off this violence.  It’s hard not to wonder whether, like those famous video games and violent movies, the game does not contribute to a need to vent feelings of violence by some viewers on those with whom they share our society.

Of course, that speculation is rhetorical in nature.  If it were proven that there is a direct correlation between watching a boxing match or football game and violent behavior, that study would be suppressed before it ever made its way into the light of day.  There is simply too much money involved to allow that sort of statement be aired.  Even our over-regulatory nanny government would keep its hands off because where there is money involved, politicians’ major concern is that they are the recipients of as much of it as possible.

If you consider this year’s unfortunate record of the number of NFL players who have been arrested for violations ranging from DUI to murder, it should cause us to ask the question, “Why are so many well-paid athletes getting themselves into trouble?”  In part, the answer goes back to money.  Take a kid out of the ghetto – and that represents the background of nearly half the players in the league – raised in a violent atmosphere – and suddenly reward them with incredibly large incomes and it is not surprising that they do not know how to handle their instantaneous new wealth.

Further consider that football, a “macho sport,” recruits those who are unafraid of risking their bodies in pursuit of moving the sticks along the sidelines.  These are tough guys on the field and they were probably the toughest guys in the hood when they grew up – which is how they survived long enough to play for the big bucks.  If they hadn’t made the NFL cut, they would most likely have had a career either running a gang back home or at least providing the muscle for it.  Should we then be surprised that so many of these men find themselves at cross purposes with the law?

The rules of basic courtesy and civility have either not been taught or have been ignored by a significant number of those who come from generations that succeeded mine.  Not that all of us Baby Boomers were always attentive to them.  But having no standards of basic civility quickly leads to outright disdain for others and from there it’s anyone’s guess what might happen next.  Well, we don’t really have to guess.  The newspapers and internet are chock full of the newsworthy reports of a morally decaying society.

Mom will have collected the football jerseys that the family wore on Sunday and gotten them ready for the laundry so they can be worn next week.  She and dad will give no thought to what those represent – other than their making a statement about the player and the team that they love and support.  It’s all in keeping with the celebration of the all-American pass time, Sunday’s newest god.

And the violence will continue throughout the country – a hundred or so new murders this week, thousands of cars being stolen and homes being burglarized.  The cycle will continue because, unwittingly, we tacitly endorse it – perhaps without realizing what our actions imply.  And the cost – well the ultimate cost is a society which will go from disarray to collapse as the prevalence of anger creeps into more of our hearts and as we become more inured to hearing and reading about it and perhaps being victimized by it ourselves.

That’s the cost of living in our modern world.  That’s the price of entertainment.

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