The American Dilemma and How We Can Fix It

Posts tagged ‘Education’

HILLARY CLINTON AND THE MOB

It would be dishonest if I didn’t admit that I’ve never been a fan of Hillary Clinton’s.  In fact, I wrote a piece elsewhere about twenty years ago in which I spoke of her as “The most dangerous woman in America.”  If my feelings on that have softened over the years it is for several reasons.  The first is that Mrs. Clinton seems to be embarked on a course of self-destruction which may well minimize her ability to attain a position of serious power.  The second is that a substantial number of challengers to that title have emerged, Sen. Elizabeth Warren being in the vanguard of those.

Despite the fact that I’ve never signed on to the Hillary Fan Club, I wish her nor anyone else any harm.  And I fear for her safety because of some statements that she recently made, specifically her remarks this week that, “Trickle down economics doesn’t work – we’ve seen that fail rather spectacularly.”

The economic theory to which Mrs. Clinton referred in that speech suggests that by lowering tax rates on those who are the wealthiest, that saves them money which they will in turn invest in creating jobs and that those jobs will create more jobs and that everyone in the economy will benefit because there will be more people employed and the taxes that they pay on their earnings will more than overcome the amount of the tax reduction which was originally given.

Of course, those like Mrs. Clinton on the left will naturally acknowledge a corollary that is the reverse of the trickle down theory.  If you believe that cutting tax rates on the wealthiest does nothing to stimulate job creation, then you naturally must believe that increasing them will have no negative impact on job creation, the consumer or the economy overall – other than to raise additional tax revenues which can then funnel into the national Treasury to be misspent by those in positions of power in Washington.

That is a statement that might involve some personal peril for the former First Lady.

In Nevada we have three propositions on the ballot.  The third of these, (cleverly named Proposition 3), wants the voters to decide whether to allow Nevada to collect a 2% tax on the revenues of companies if those companies’ revenues exceed $1 million per year.  Incidentally, it doesn’t matter whether the company is profitable or if it loses money.  That’s Govthink at it’s finest.  The purported beneficiary of these funds to be collected will be our schools.  As one might expect, the NEA has endorsed this proposal.  And the AFL-CIO which initially supported the idea has, perhaps because of their experience in sponsoring Obamacare, have now changed their view and opposes its passage.

Without discussing the arguments pro and con, (I voted “NO”), this is yet another tax which purportedly will benefit a specific cause – and which will, almost as soon as it is passed, wind up being something that goes into the General Fund and will be used for whatever purposes those in Carson City choose.  I saw this same scenario when Illinois authorized the creation of the state lottery – which was to benefit education.  I gave it three years before those proceeds were swept into the General Fund – and, as I recall, it only took two.

Among the plethora of political ads that one would expect the week before an election, there have been a substantial number which have urged Nevadans to vote “NO” on Prop 3.  I have yet to see one that advocates its passage – which suggests to me that the “NO” side has a lot of money backing it.  Considering the fact that casinos are the principal source of revenue to the state and that they clearly would be subject to this proposed tax, it doesn’t require an Einstein to guess that they are among the funders for these ads.  And if you questioned that, one of the spokespeople advocating the defeat of the measure is none other than His Honor, the much beloved former Mayor of Las Vegas, Oscar Goodman.

Before becoming Las Vegas’ mayor, Goodman spent most of his career as an attorney – more specifically as a defense attorney.  He handled many high profile clients and represented them with vigor and very positive results.  Among those he defended were people associated with “the Mob” including Meyer Lansky, Frank “Lefty” Rosenthal, “Fat Herbie” Blitzstein (whose grandson owns a maintenance company that services my pool), Nicky Scarfo and Anthony “Tony the Ant” Spilotro.  It would be fair that many in the underworld viewed Mayor Goodman as their “go to” guy when it came to defending them from prosecution.  And it’s hardly a secret that before Nevada’s casinos became corporate entities, they were controlled and run by “The Mob.”

As I write this, one of Mayor Goodman’s ads appeared on FOX News.  The text of the ad (slightly paraphrased because I don’t type as fast as he can speak) is:

“If Prop 3 passes it will have an impact on everyone in Nevada.  Do you know what happens when a corporation gets a tax increase?  They pass it on to all of us.  They fire their own employees.  This will cost us more in what we pay at the grocery store, what we pay for health care, it’s going to smack all of us right in the jaw.”

Wait a minute.  That’s trickle down economics.  The only difference is that in this case the former mayor discusses the impact of an increase in tax rates rather than a decrease.

While I don’t recall reading any stories that Hillary Clinton plays polo or enjoys horseback riding, I would suggest that before she snuggles up for a good night’s rest, it might behoove her to check for any equine body parts that might have unexpectedly been placed under the covers.

Advertisements

THE ASHEN VIZIER AND THE 535 MENTAL MIDGETS

We know that if we give a junkie a dose of heroin she’s going to use it and come back asking for more.

We know that if we send government our tax dollars they’re going to spend them and come back asking for more.

We call the junkie a law breaker.  We call the politician a law maker.  That’s about the only difference between them.

If we apprehend the junkie, we the taxpayers pay for her support either in a rehab facility or a prison.  We the taxpayers who elect the politicians pay their support through our tax dollars to ensure they have ready access to what little they leave us in our pockets.

My friends used to laugh at my view of owning a car.  I summed it up one day on returning from a repair shop where I had some mechanical work done.  As I put it, “Owning a car is like having a vacuum cleaner permanently attached to and sucking at the contents of  your wallet.”

That’s a lot like the way government operates.

Many years ago my father was audited by the IRS.  For three years in a row.  The focus of their pogrom was on determining whether the business deductions he took were legitimate.  The result of these audits were three “No Change” determinations by that esteemed agency.  In other words, dad had documentation for every penny that he claimed and those deductions met the definitions of the Internal Revenue Code.

Nevertheless, it’s always stressful when you are accused of something and are assumed to be guilty until you prove your innocence – which is the approach that the IRS takes with us taxpayers.  So dad dreaded these encounters passionately.  I think that was mostly because he was an honest man and the implication that he was otherwise challenged his sense of decency.

At dinner one night, I believe it was at the conclusion of the second audit, my father told us that he had said to the auditor, “Wouldn’t it just be easier if you took everything I made and then just refunded what you think my family and I are entitled to live on?”  Little did he know that would be the direction this country would turn a half century later.

As we are now little more than three weeks from the much touted precipice of the “fiscal cliff,” who is in charge of making rational decisions to repair the folly we have already wrought?  It should not surprise you that it is the very people who have brought us here in the first place.

Our players consist of the Ashen Vizier and the 535 Mental Midgets – a cartoon cast that would be the envy of both Walt Disney and Cecil B. DeMille.  (My apologies to the twenty or so responsible people in Congress who have a pulse, a brain, common sense, and the moral courage both to understand and to tell the truth).

So here’s where we are.  Stuck over defining who’s “rich” and who should pay more of their “fair share.”  As though that matters any more than renaming a school in honor of Horace Mann will provide the students inside with a better quality education.

The facts are (and amazingly both sides agree on this) that if we follow the Ashen Vizier’s plan and start taxing the “rich” more, we will raise less than three percent of the money we need to balance our budget.  In other words, this “plan” leaves ninety-seven percent of our problem unresolved.

Since it’s hard for any of us to contemplate something that has burgeoned into the size of our deficits with all those zeroes, let’s look at this from a standpoint which we all can understand because we all have to deal with it.  A family and its budget.

You and your spouse have been wasteful and indulgent of the kids.  You’ve let your finances get out of control – but you’ve finally decided it’s time to deal with reality and get yourself back on the right path.  (Those annoying phone calls from creditors might have given your decision some impetus).

So you go down to Ashen Vizier & Associates credit counseling service.  You’ve seen their ads on television (a lot) and they promise that they have the solution to your financial woes.

The nice receptionist asks you to fill out a profile of your monthly income and expenses and then you are brought in for an audience with the Vizier himself.  He is a very self-assured and impressive sounding chap.

After he reviews your situation, he astutely points out that you are spending one thousand dollars a month more than you are taking home.  You and your spouse, in awe at this wisdom, nod your heads in agreement.  Okay.  The Vizier has identified your problem.  That’s a great start.  But, you ask him, “What do we do about it?”

As he stands up from behind his desk and completes the putt he was working on when you came into his office, he says, “No problema.”  He turns to the reference library which is on the wall behind him, filled with hundreds of the largest books you have ever seen.  He immediately pulls one down from the shelf and turns expertly to the middle of this tome where he finds the solution to your difficulty.

On page 462, Paragraph 7 he shows you a program which the Federal Government has developed just for people who are like you.  All you need to do is complete the paperwork and every month thereafter you will begin receiving a special allotment of thirty dollars.  It’s the program called “A Little Something Extra For The People Who Are A Little Short Each Month Entitlement.”

it is with some trepidation that you point out that will still leave you nine hundred seventy dollars a month deeper in debt.  But the Vizier grins broadly at you and says, “Don’t worry – that will take care of itself.”

Armed with this wisdom (and the promise of an extra thirty dollars a month) you and your spouse leave the office in an upbeat mood.  You decide to go to a movie, buy some popcorn and a few sodas and spend the thirty dollars you will soon be getting plus a little more.  Like your old hero, Alfred E. Neuman and your newly found one, the Vizier you are comforted with their life-guiding principle, “What, me worry?”

Somewhere I have quite a few copies of “Mad Magazine” stored away.  I think I know where they are.  Talking about all this financial stuff always makes me a little dizzy.

If I can find them, maybe I’ll curl up with a couple and drift off to sleep.  As I think about it, they are nearly forty years old and may be worth something.  Which is more than I can say for the Ashen Vizier and the 535 Mental Midgets.

WHAT I LEARNED FROM MY ENGLISH TEACHER

Mr. Gamble was an instructor at my grammar school. He taught English and Latin and was assuredly one of the most demanding of all my teachers. He was not satisfied with anything short of perfection in his pupils. I had a tremendous amount of respect for him – and I’m glad he’s dead.

 He was a man of average height, perhaps a few pounds overweight – but he carried that off well with his martinet-like erect stance. When Mr. Gamble taught me he must have been in his late 50’s. He was bald – other than having about a two inch tall ring of hair running around his head – each hair looking as though he had just left the barber’s chair – perfectly trimmed and in place. He had a large Roman nose which always drew my eye when I looked at him.

 The suits he wore were very conservative – either charcoal gray or navy blue pin stripes, with an occasional dark brown one thrown into the mix. There was always a perfectly arranged handkerchief in his breast pocket – folded in a triangular design. His tie was precisely knotted and his shoes looked as though they had spent an hour under a skilled shoe shine artist’s capable hands. You could practically see your reflection in the leather.

 While we might get away with talking for a few seconds after one of our other teachers entered the room – that just didn’t happen in Mr. Gamble’s class. As soon as he entered the classroom, there was total silence. Mr. Gamble indeed commanded respect – and we gave it to him.

 Mr. Gamble had a true love of language. You may ask why any school would even teach Latin – a dead language. But, of course, a great deal of Latin has filtered its way into English – and to know our own language’s roots is to gain a greater appreciation and understanding of the language we speak. You will remember that this was “back in the days” when schools emphasized learning broad vocabularies and actually taught grammar.

 Each of us knew the difference between “to”, “too” and “two” and “there”, “their” and “they’re” – distinctions which seem to be lost on a significant portion of those who speak and write English in America today.

Mr. Gamble died of a sudden heart attack a number of years after I had graduated. I was truly saddened by his death and remember crying when I heard about it. He was a demanding teacher but he did his job in the same immaculate manner in which he dressed. I believe that his pupils are better communicators because of what he shared with us.

When I said that I was glad he had died it is because I can only imagine how the cacophony of what today passes for English would have offended his hearing. We live in a world where “Yo”, “Bro”, “Dude” and “Awesome” seem to comprise the entire vocabulary necessary to communicate. And that is tragic since we have inherited an incredibly rich language – filled with meaningful words – which by and large go unused by the general population.

 If it is true that, “what separates man from the lower animals is our ability to communicate through language” – we are apparently doing our utmost to narrow the gap. I’m glad that Mr. Gamble has been spared all this. And I wonder if there are any other teachers who share Mr. Gamble’s passion for language – and how they must feel.

Tag Cloud