The American Dilemma and How We Can Fix It

Posts tagged ‘dog treats’

WHAT I LEARNED TODAY FROM DOGGIE TREATS

I was bad, really bad.  Perhaps the more appropriate term is lazy.  Although I again have the three goldens with Gracie and me, I didn’t have the energy yesterday to bake the dog biscuits that they love.  And to make matters worse, I was nearly out of the other little goodies that they get each morning when we come back from the park.

It was too early to stop by Pet Smart to pick up a stash, so I stopped at my local supermarket to see what they had in stock.  Well, they had the treats I normally include as part of the kids’ morning mix, but they were significantly more expensive than at Pet Smart.  So I looked for a short term alternative on the shelf and found one.  As they were on sale they were quite inexpensive and appeared to contain a preponderance of natural ingredients.

As with products I buy for my own consumption, I checked to see whether they were made in the U. S. A. or if, like so much in the pet food department, were a product of China.  I looked all over the package but was unable to find the country of origin listed.  The only statement was that they were “distributed by Del Monte Foods’ Pet Division”.  The term “distributed” led me to believe that they probably were not made here.

When we returned home, (the kids patiently sat in the car waiting for me to get them their goodies), I called the number listed on the package to speak with Del Monte’s customer service department.  The young lady in New Jersey was very helpful and assured me that this product was indeed made in the USA.  And that’s when I learned something.

I’m not sure what law Congress passed that applies, but as my contact at Del Monte put it, “Only products which are made in foreign countries must indicate the country of origin on the packaging.  If you see a product with no indication of where it is made, you can rest assured that it was produced here.”

I wished I had known that earlier as it would have saved me five minutes scrutinizing the package and the time it took to call her and for her to answer my question.  I did suggest that since there is a lot of printing on the package, it might be helpful to the consumer if they simply added the statement, “Made in the USA” to the package, removing any question from the mind of the consumer who cares about that sort of thing.

She agreed and said she would “Pass that suggestion along.”

Well, the good news is that the kids liked their new treats.  And the better news is that I got motivated to bake them two batches of their biscuits.  That is good news for them and for me.  (I have gotten in the habit of eating a couple of them every morning for breakfast).

Don’t laugh.  They are not as hard as Milk Bone biscuits.  In fact, they have the consistency of scones.  And all of us find them rather tasty.  They go very nicely with my morning coffee – and I’m looking forward to breakfast tomorrow morning now that I’ve laid in a new supply.

For those of you who have companion dogs, I have included the recipe below.  If your dogs are like this pack, they will love them – and you may as well.

PEANUT BUTTER DOG (AND PEOPLE) BISCUITS

Dry Ingredients

1/2 cup of original Oat Meal flakes

1/2 cup of yellow or blue Corn Meal

2   cups of flour (I use equal parts of garbanzo, barley, brown rice and whole wheat flours).

1   Tbsp. of Toasted Wheat Germ

1    Tbsp. of Toasted Sunflower Seeds (unsalted)

In a medium mixing bowl, stir together all ingredients until thoroughly blended

Wet Ingredients

1/2 cup of filtered water

1/2 cup of oil (Safflower preferred)

2  large eggs or 1 jumbo egg

1 Tbsp. of pure vanilla extract

2 Tbsps. of honey

3 Tbsps. of chunky peanut butter (almond or pecan butter make a nice variation)

In a large mixing bowl with a wire whisk blend all wet ingredients thoroughly.  Add dry ingredients and blend until all liquid is absorbed.

Turn out dough on a wooden board and form into a ball.  Roll out until about 1/2 inch in thickness and cut into shapes.

On a lightly greased baking sheet place cut out biscuits and bake in a 400 degree oven for twenty minutes.  (I normally make two batches at a time and exchange the baking sheets from one level of the oven to the other after 10 minutes so that they bake evenly).  Turn oven off.

Let rest in the oven (door ajar) for another 10 minutes.  Put trays on a wire rack to cool.  Store in air tight containers.

(I have no idea how long the shelf life of these biscuits is because two batches only last us about three days).

“Bone Appetit!”

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